About

I AM CURRENTLY A 4TH-YEAR DOCTORAL CANDIDATE IN THE LAB OF DR. JORDAN KARUBIAN AT TULANE UNIVERSITY, WHERE I AM STUDYING THE RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN UNSTABLE RESOURCE LANDSCAPES AND BEHAVIORAL PLASTICITY. MY RESEARCH INTERESTS GENERALLY CONCERN THE MODERN USE OF HIGH-RESOLUTION DATA COLLECTION TO DEVELOP A GREATER UNDERSTANDING OF ANIMAL BEHAVIOR. SPECIFICALLY, MY DISSERTATION WORK FOCUSES ON THE FORAGING AND BREEDING ECOLOGY OF BROWN PELICANS (PELECANUS OCCIDENTALIS), USING BIOLOGGING TECHNOLOGIES TO UNDERSTAND HOW WITHIN-INDIVIDUAL VARIABILITY DEFINES FORAGING STRATEGIES AND IMPACTS BREEDING SUCCESS. I AM ALSO USING FIELD DATA TO PARAMETERIZE SIMULATED FORAGING POPULATIONS IN ORDER TO UNDERSTAND HOW COLONY-LEVEL PRODUCTIVITY MAY BE AFFECTED UNDER REAL AND HYPOTHETICAL ENVIRONMENTAL SCENARIOS IN THE NORTHERN GULF OF MEXICO.
I PREVIOUSLY RECEIVED MY B.SC. IN RESOURCE BIOLOGY AND BIODIVERSITY FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF LOUISIANA AT LAFAYETTE IN 2009, AND A M.SC. IN POPULATION AND CONSERVATION BIOLOGY FROM TEXAS STATE UNIVERSITY – SAN MARCOS IN 2012. MY THESIS WORK WITH REDDISH EGRETS (EGRETTA RUFESCENS) CONTRIBUTED TO ARTICLES THAT HAVE SINCE BEEN REFERENCED IN SEVERAL OF THE SPECIES’ CONSERVATION PLANS. FOR MORE INFORMATION ON THIS AND OTHER PROJECTS, SEE MY RESEARCH PAGE.
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